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Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton — A Real Woman of Grace

In my reliquary, I have a first-class relic of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first native-born American to be canonized. I find it appropriate that a woman was the first of our land to be lifted to the altar of Christ by Holy Mother Church. After all, our country and all of North America is dedicated to the woman: the Blessed Virgin Mary under her title of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Our special patroness is also the Blessed Mother under her name, Immaculate Conception.

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Our Lady of Fatima and Women's Role in World Peace

Commentary by Susan Brinkmann, OCDS

History was made in May 2017 when Women of Grace® founder, Johnnette Benkovic, now Johnnette Williams, delivered a message about the dignity and vocation of women on the world stage at the United Nations - a message delivered while standing in the shadow of the same Pilgrim Virgin Statue that first visited this global entity 65 years ago!

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How to Lead Virtual Small Groups

Women of Grace® study programs give you the blessed privilege of witnessing the magnificent movement of the Holy Spirit in the lives of the women who attend – and you will experience His dynamic power and grace in your own life as well. As your study group learns about the great gift of authentic femininity and how to live it out in our world today, hearts will be healed, lives will be changed, and souls will be saved. This is indeed a time of transformation, renewal, and deepening commitment.

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Mary Visits Her Children: Our Lady of Lourdes

Perhaps no other appearance of the Blessed Virgin Mary has captured people’s hearts and imaginations like those she made to Bernadette Soubirous in Lourdes, France in 1858. Our Lady appeared eighteen times that year to an impoverished, uneducated fourteen-year-old girl who lived with her family in an old jail. Since that time, more than five thousand healings are reported to have taken place in the spot where the Blessed Mother appeared; sixty-four of them the Catholic Church has proclaimed “miraculous.”

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Woman of Grace: St. Scholastica

Woman of Grace: St. Scholastica (480 – 543)

St. Gregory the Great recounts this story from the life of St. Benedict’s beloved twin sister, St. Scholastica, which shows how expressing our petitions to God with childlike faith and confidence sometimes yields immediate and amazing results.

After Benedict founded a monastery for men, Scholastica remained very close to her brother, founding a convent for women some miles away. Every year Scholastica went to visit Benedict at a little place just outside the monastery gate.

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Women of Grace: St. Teresa of Avila (1515 - 1582)

St. Teresa of Avila shows us it is never too late to get serious about our prayer life. Born Dona Teresa Sanchez Cepeda Davila y Ahumada, Teresa was an active child with a big imagination and great sensitivity of heart. Little Teresa and her brother Roderigo were intrigued by the lives of the saints and the martyrs, and often sought to imitate their holy example.

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Morning of Grace Deepens Faith, Lifts Hearts

by Denise McKane

Every Morning of Grace is another opportunity to have our Lord stretch our hearts ever larger. Our Blessed Mother and her Holy Spouse take us and form us more and more into His little handmaids. “For Such a Time as This” we give Him our “fiats.”

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An Army in the Making: Women of Grace Comes to Ukraine!

Women of Grace in the Ukraine

Although separated by almost 6,000 miles, the Holy Spirit forged a powerful connection between Women of Grace® founder Johnnette Williams and a young woman in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine whose dream was to raise an army of women to serve God. Today, that army is in the making!

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Woman of Grace: St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

 

St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein, 1891 – 1942)

She was a brilliant scholar, a contemplative mystic, and a “liberated” feminist. At various times she was also a devout Jew, an atheist, a philosopher, a Catholic, and a Carmelite nun. Hers was a heart that hungered for truth, with a passion that burned with such purity and clarity that Pope John Paul II, whose own Mulieris Dignitatem and “Letter to Women” bear the unmistakable imprint of her spirit, canonized her less than fifty years after her death at Auschwitz.

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