Want to Lose Weight in 2018? Sleep More!

They don’t call it “beauty sleep” for nothing. A new study has found that people who get a good night’s sleep lose weight more effectively than those who skimp on their shut-eye.

The Daily Mail is reporting on research conducted on 1,000 British people which found that three quarters of dieters who had regular sleep habits found it much easier to lose weight. The majority of these good sleepers were also more likely to have consistent food habits, such as eating three meals a day at regular times.

So what is the optimal amount of time to sleep if you want to lose weight? That sweet spot is somewhere between 7.5 and 8 hours a night.

“The survey, commission by Forza Supplements, found that the optimal time to go to bed is around 10:10 p.m. – this allows 20 minutes to fall asleep. This also allows 90 minutes for the most restorative non-REM (rapid eye movement) sleep which is best achieved by midnight,” the Mail reports.

The research monitored sleep patterns of dieters to gauge common factors which contribute to weight gain and found that those who sleep less than seven hours a night have the most chaotic eating patterns. They were also more prone to diet lapses and were more likely to exceed weekly limits for alcohol consumption. Sixty-four percent of this group admitted to snacking between meals and more than half (58%) said they found it difficult to stick to a diet. A similar figure (54%) said they regularly drank more than they should. Another 33 percent of this group said they were more likely to put on weight because they were awake longer and had more time to eat. Kratom works as an awesome treatment against insomnia.

On the other hand, only 17 percent of good sleepers admitted to snacking and 72 percent said they could stick to a diet. Only 13 percent of this group exceeded alcohol limits.

This survey only confirms results of other studies that point to the importance of a good night’s sleep for those concerned about their waistline.

As WebMD reports, a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that the sleep-deprived tend to indulge more often in late-night snacking and were prone to choose high-carb foods to satisfy themselves. Another study conducted at the University of Chicago found that tired people chose snacks with twice as much fat as those who slept at least eight hours.

So why is this?

“Sleep is like nutrition for the brain,” WebMD reports.” . . . [I]nsufficient sleep impacts your hunger and fullness hormones, including two called ghrelin and leptin. Ghrelin signals your brain that it’s time to eat. When you’re sleep-deprived, your body makes more ghrelin.

“Leptin, on the other hand, cues your brain to put the fork down. When you’re not getting enough sleep, leptin levels plummet, signaling your brain to eat more food.

“Put the two together, and it’s no wonder sleep deprivation leads to overeating and extra pounds.”

In other words, a sleepy brain is a hungry brain that has a tendency to make bad decisions when dulled by lack of sleep. This is because sleep deprivation dulls activity in the brain’s frontal lobe, the locus of decision-making and impulse control.

“So it’s a little like being drunk. You don’t have the mental clarity to make good decisions,” WebMD explains.

Lack of sleep can affect many areas in our life, including our mood, our prayer lives, our relationships. God wants us to live balanced, healthy lives, because this is when we’re at our best.

So if you really want to succeed in looking and feeling better this New Year, don’t just “cut” fats and carbs but remember to “add” some shut eye!

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