The Problem with Constitutional Homeopathy

SH asks:  “I am wondering if constitutional homeopathy treatment is considered part of the new Age movement? I am giving it to my 9 yr old son for ADHD and allergies. I am a little concerned as I heard it can be related to occultism.”

homeopathyic medicinesHomeopathy is not related to the occult. However, it is based upon the New Age belief in an alleged “vital force” or “life principle” that its founder, Samuel Hahnemann, believed was prevalent in every living being. In his Organon, he writes that this vital force is a “spiritual vital force” that animates living organism and keeps the body working in perfect harmony.

The problem with this theory is that science has never been able to find evidence of the existence of this vital force. This explains why any alternative based upon its existence is considered to be pseudo-scientific, including all forms of “energy medicine” so popular with proponents of the New Age.

This will also explain why homeopathic treatments of all kinds have consistently failed in laboratory testing. The failure rate is so high, in fact, that the UK Parliament’s Science and Technology Committee has formally requested an end to all funding of homeopathic facilities in that country – which is really saying something because homeopathy is much more widespread in England with whole hospitals devoted to homeopathic medicine. The only reason it is still available there is because the Prince of Wales and the UK Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt are supporters. (Politics never fails to fail us, does it?)

As for constitutional homeopathy, it is considered to be the third of three levels of homeopathic therapy. The first level is that of first aid. The second is known as acute homeopathy which is used to treat conditions such as colds and the flu and other ailments that eventually go away on their own. The third level is constitutional homeopathy which refers to the treatment of a variety of symptoms in a person and tends to be used for more chronic conditions such as those you describe in your e-mail.

Regardless of the level, it’s still homeopathy and, therefore, a pseudo-science. We have nothing but testimonials attesting to its efficacy and, unfortunately, testimonials cannot be relied upon to determine if a treatment really works. There are simply too many reasons why someone would believe an alternative like homeopathy is working even when it really isn’t. This is why personal testimonials should never be used as “proof” that something works.

Send your New Age question to newage@womenofgrace.com

 

 

 

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