Is it True that Satanic Messages Can be Hidden in Rock Music?

MH asks: “I did a search on google for the record labels owned by Wiccans to promote Satanism.  I came across this website: http://jeffmilner.com/backmasking.htm that gives some examples of backmasking.  It has backward lyrics of songs with satanic messages.  I was wondering if this is true or if someone just made it up.  I do not know how play a record backwards myself and do not know the website as a trustworthy source.  Do you know if these backward lyrics are accurate or a trustworthy source to look to?” 

This is an excellent question! The technique of burying Satanic or any other kind of message in music that can only be heard when played backward is called backmasking and it is not made up. It is 100% true.

For those who have never heard of it before, backmasking is a technique which involves recording of a sound or message in reverse and then placing it in a recording that is meant to be played forward. When played normally, the reversed message will sound like gibberish; however, when the song is played backward, the message can be clearly heard.

The Beatles popularized baskmasking after John Lennon accidentally played tapes for the song, “Rain,” in reverse. He liked the way it sounded and shared it with the other Beatles. According to Beatles’ producer George Martin, the group had been experimenting with the speed of their music and reversing the “Tomorrow Never Knows” tapes, which gave him the idea of reversing Lennon’s vocals and guitar.  Backmasking became  a sensation when the group released their White Album which contained a backmasked message at the end of the song, “I’m So Tired.” When played in reverse, Lennon is heard to say, “Paul is dead man, miss him, miss him, miss him.” Another cut on the same album, “Revolution 9,” contains a message hidden in the repeated phrase, “number nine” which, when played backward, says “turn me on dead man.”

Since then, backmasked messages have been turning up in all kinds of music and contain messages ranging from humorous to satanic.

An example of the latter is a cut by a band known as Cradle of Filth. Entitled “Dinner at Deviant’s Palace,” it consists almost entirely of strange sounds and a reversed reading of the Lord’s Prayer (which plays a major role in Black Masses).

Perhaps one of the most famous cases concerning backmasked messages occurred in 1990 when a song recorded by Judas Priest was being blamed for the suicide and attempted suicide of two men in 1985. The two men, Raymond Belknap and James Vance, allegedly were drinking beer and smoking pot for several hours while listening to a Judas Priest album in which they claim a backmasked message in the song, “Better by You, Better than Me” encouraged them to commit suicide. The two went to a church playground where Belknap shot himself with a 12 gauge shotgun and died instantly. Vance tried to do the same but the gun slipped. He later told a reporter of a suicide pact he had made with Balknap, saying “We had been programmed. I knew I was going to do it. I was afraid. I didn’t want to die. It’s just as if I had no choice.” He died three years later and his parents filed a civil action alleging that the Judas Priest track, when played backward, encouraged suicide and repeatedly said, “Do it.”

While it is entirely possible for these messages to be hidden in music, most folks don’t play their CDs backward which means the messages can’t be heard by anyone except those who know how to play a CD backward – which you can do easily enough on the Internet.

If these messages can’t be clearly heard unless played backward, how effective are they in influencing behavior?

Not very, according to the experts. Psychologists and psychiatrists say backmasking is essentially useless because unless the message is deliberately played backward, it simply can’t be heard. Some suggest that a reversed message hidden in music can be grasped by the subconscious, but there is no evidence that this can be done.

What would be more threatening that backmasked music is something known as a subliminal signal which can be hidden in music. This is something Rome exorcist Fr. Gabriele Amorth speaks about in his book An Exorcist: More Stories, in which he explains the methods used by the Wiccan recording companies mentioned in MH’s question.

“Subliminal signs are transmitted at such a high pitch that we are unable to hear them. The signal is meant to disorient; at an intensity of 3,000 kilocycles per second, it acts on our unconscious, but our ears cannot capture it precisely because it is supersonic. Unbeknownst to us, the brain produces a natural drug as a result of the stimuli it receives, and it disorients us. Suddenly, we feel strange. This strange feeling induces us to seek real drugs and causes drug addicts to increase their intake” (page 73).

Recordings that contain these signals are often consecrated to Satan during a black mass before they are released to the market.

Fr. Amorth also testifies to the existence of Satanic backmasked music, saying that when played backward, the messages are always the same: “rebellion against parents, against society, against all that exists; the unleashing of all sexual instincts; and the urge to create an anarchist state with the ultimate triumph of Satan’s universal kingdom. A few songs are hymns dedicated to Satan” (pg. 74).

These bands do not hide their intention of luring youth to Satan with some even admitting outright that this is their mission.

Comments are closed.